(2015, Episode 4)

Last week, I posted the first portion of our 2-part series celebrating all that was great (and a few things that weren’t) about 1990. While the first part focused heavily on film and TV, most of this second part is dedicated to our bread and butter-music.

Here’s some of what gets discussed by Big Money, Michael Parr, Dr. Z and The Packet Man (Michael Cunningham) in this episode:

The Milli Vanilli Lip Sync Scandal: And how no one thought it odd that people who barely spoke English were able to successfully not only sing, but rap in American accents. 1990 was not only the year that Milli Vanilli was found out, but vocalist Martha Wash found her booming instrument used on records by no less than three huge dance acts (Seduction, Black Box and C+C Music Factory) without her consent.

That ain’t Martha Wash below, btw…

Jordy: No, the rapping toddler didn’t make his musical debut for another three years. but once Cunningham goes on a tangent, there’s not much pulling him back.

Rap Blows Up/Goes Pop: Thanks to the biggest artist of the year, MC Hammer, hip-hop goes mainstream to a level that no one could have predicted. Hip-hop snobs, already displeased with Hammer, see red when a white rapper of dubious credentials (Vanilla Ice) steals a page from Hammer’s playbook and takes rap further mainstream. Thankfully, there was not only a fair amount of authentic hardcore hip hop, but also albums like LL Cool J’s Mama Said Knock You Out, a work that skillfully balanced mainstream accessibility with hip-hop’s street aesthetic.

Will Smith: The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air debuted in 1990, catapulting the “Parents Just Don’t Understand” rapper to superstardom. The panel discusses when Will lost his “cool” card (don’t worry…we all agree it was long after Fresh Prince went off the air).

Musical Debuts Of 1990: This was the year that brought us the mellifluous tones of Mariah Carey (and a classic first single) as well as The Black Crowes, a rootsy band that served as an antidote to the pop/metal theatrics currently ruling the day (like, for example, Nelson–a group that also made their debut in 1990).

Recommendations: The panel delivers three recommendations each from 1990, and it’s a wild list that includes Public Enemy’s magnum opus, the greatest hip-hop teen movie of all time, a masterpiece from a group of new wave icons, and…Parker Lewis Can’t Lose!

Grab a listen in the player below. You can also stream or download it directly from Liberated Syndication or iTunes!

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